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Parents: Ready to Elevate Your Parenting Game?

Parenting is tough!

There are a few crucial components that must be in place if parents wish to effectively manage their child’s difficult, annoying, defiant, and/or inappropriate behaviors.  These components are quite literally a recipe for positive parenting.

What are the “components” that parents need?

  • They need a strong, dedicated support system
  • They need smart, straightforward advice when needed
  • They need patience, dedication, and a good deal of common-sense
  • They need useful, informative resources
  • and they need practical, effective parenting tools

What kind of “parenting tools?”

There are a wide range of exceptional parenting tools available to parents – but there’s one in particular that deserves some special attention: The Parent Coach Plan

The Parent Coach Plan is a comprehensive and easy-to-use behavior management tool with many labels.  It can be referred to as a…

Parenting ProgramDiscipline Program
– Child Discipline Plan– Parenting System
– Behavior Program– Behavioral “Point System”

Whatever you choose to call it – the objective is the same:  to improve child behavior through the use of an in-home behavior management system designed to help parents instill a firm, fair, consistent, and structured discipline regimen.

Basically, the philosophy behind it is that BETTER PARENTING = BETTER BEHAVIOR

Why Try a Child Behavior Program?

Why not? 

A well-utilized behavior program provides structure and consistency in the home. 

Children have a tendency to respond well to structure and consistency.

A detailed behavior program helps to establish firm limits and clear expectations.

This creates less confusion and less ambiguity regarding household rules.

A well-thought-out behavior program holds children accountable for their negative behavior.

There’s no more “getting off easy!”

A customizable behavior program can be modified to meet the various/changing needs of the child.

New issues or behaviors appearing?  No problem – simply adjust the program as needed!

How much time and effort is required to set up and use the program?

Both are simple. 

The program can be set up and ready to use within a short period of time – usually less than 30 minutes!  After that, there is only a minimal amount of effort needed each day/evening in order to effectively utilize the program in your home.

5 Types of Behavior Charts To Use With Your Child

  • Sticker Chart/Reward Chart

A sticker chart (or reward chart) is a very simple type of behavior chart that works well with younger children.  Basically, anytime a child performs a specific behavior (i.e., using the toilet, picking up his/her toys, going to bed on time, etc.) the child gets a sticker to add to his/her chart.  Once the sticker chart is filled, the child can trade in the sticker chart for a special object or privilege.

  • Chore Chart

A chore chart is essentially a behavior chart that tracks whether or not a child or teen has completed his/her chores for the day or week.  Often times, the child or teen can earn special privileges for completing the tasks that are listed on the chore chart.  Parents should make sure that the chores listed on the chore chart are age-appropriate and are not too overwhelming or difficult to complete. 

  • Hygiene Chart

Hygiene charts are an effective way to get children and teens to complete their daily hygiene tasks.  These tasks might include daily showers (or every-other-day), teeth-brushing, hair-combing, wearing of clean clothes, using deodorant, fingernail-clipping, face-washing, etc.  Hygiene charts don’t typically have a reward associated with completion – but they can.  Hygiene charts are more often used as a “checklist” of sorts to assure everything is taken care of.

  • Feelings Chart

Feelings charts can take many forms and can be used with various age groups for various reasons.  For younger children, a feelings chart can help them to identify various feelings that they might experience throughout the day or week – feelings that they might not otherwise be able to articulate.  For teens, a feelings chart is a good way to track and record feelings throughout the day, week, or month. 

  • Behavior Chart

Behavior charts are very similar to reward charts – only they are more appropriate for older children and teens.  Rather than earning stickers for positive behavior, the child or teen earns points or “checkmarks” for positive behavior.  There is almost always a reward/consequence aspect to behavior charts. Kids usually earn rewards for positive behavior and consequences for negative behavior.

If you are interested in a behavior chart that takes things a step further then consider trying the original behavior program offered at www.parentcoachplan.com.

Behavior Management Tips for Parents

Behavior management is crucial to positive and effective parenting.  To manage behavior effectively, parents should start out by adhering to a few simple guidelines:

  • Maintain composure while parenting – especially while disciplining.

Losing one’s ability to remain cool means that there are now two people in need of intervention.

  • Know when to act and when to ignore specific behaviors.

Rule of thumb: If it is dangerous, illegal, or immoral, then act.  If it is simply annoying or disruptive – ignore.  Ultimately, it is up to the parent to decide how (or if) to respond.

  • Provide structure and consistency.

Without these two elements in place, children will feel anxious and uncertain.  This may also make them want to “test the waters.”

  • Set firm boundaries and clear expectations.

Behavior management is next to impossible without these two factors in place.

  • Make sure consequences are administered swiftly.

The quicker the consequence, the bigger the impact on the child receiving it.

  • Use behavior management to teach, not to control.

Behavior management is not about exerting power and control over a child – it is about redirecting and teaching.

Sure, behavior management is not always as easy as this list might lead you to believe – but these six pieces of advice are a good place to start. 

Parenting can be a daunting task.  It is often a challenging, exhausting, and thankless job.  It is important to remember, however, that it is perhaps the most important role you will ever have.  The ability to manage behavior in a firm, calculated manner takes confidence, insight, and know-how.  Parenting is a game of trial and error.  Some behavior management techniques may work well with some children – but not with others.  Keep trying – don’t get discouraged!

If you are looking for a fabulous behavior management tool, then The Parent Coach Plan might be just what you are looking for!  This exclusive parenting program is designed for parents looking to reach their peak parenting potential!  It is simple to use and can be downloaded and implemented right away! 

Ready to up your parenting game?

Parenting Classes or a Child Discipline Program?  Which is Better?

Parents are often faced with new challenges and difficult decisions as their parenting journey progresses.  New issues are constantly arising as their children grow and change during each stage. 

One of the ways that parents can address the issues that they are constantly facing is to attend a parenting class.  Parenting classes can be attended in-person or they can be attended online – either as an actual class or as a series of videos and/or readings that can be watched/read at the attendees discretion.

Parenting classes offer a wide range of topics – from managing discipline to time management and from  parental responsibilities to family meeting tips.  Many classes cover a variety of age groups, while others focus on a specific age group or area of concern.

These classes provide an opportunity for parents to learn about common challenges and find the tools or techniques needed to address them.

Though they can be pricy and inconvenient, parenting classes can also be interesting, informative, and beneficial. 

An excellent alternative to parenting classes is to try implementing a child discipline program in the home.  An effective child discipline program can teach parents what they need to know to improve child behavior and to establish a discipline regimen that is firm, fair, consistent, and structured.

The Parent Coach Plan is one such program.  It provides parents with a practical, easy-to-use, and highly effective behavior management system designed to improve child behavior.

If you are considering attending a parenting class, then why not try a child discipline program?  Both are informative and beneficial – but the child discipline program is an actual parenting tool that can be put in place rather quickly and with minimal effort – and possibly with better results!

Complete Parenting Solutions also offers a free set of behavior contracts and other parenting tools with any purchase of The Parent Coach Plan.  Best of all, the program can be purchased as a digital download – which means you can get started right away!  Click here to learn more!

Creating and Using an Effective Behavior Chart

A well-designed behavior chart is a simple and effective parenting tool that can help to improve child behavior. When a child is rewarded for positive behavior then he or she is more likely to repeat that behavior.  Likewise, if a restriction or negative consequence is earned, then that child will do his or her best to avoid that behavior.

Creating an effective behavior chart is rather simple.  Here are a few steps to get you started:

1.  Decide which behaviors you would like for your child to start or stop.  A start behavior is one that you want your child to start displaying (such as using manners, completing a specific task/chore, or using a respectful voice-tone) while stop behaviors are those that you want your child to stop doing (such as cussing, arguing, interrupting, etc.).

2.  Make a list of about 4-5 behaviors that you would like for your child to work on each day.  Place this list of behaviors on your child’s behavior chart (the chart should consist of a column down the left-hand side of the page which includes the list of behaviors – then one space or checkbox for each day of the week (7 total) to the right of each listed behavior.

3.  Decide on the rewards and consequences that will be earned and write those at the bottom oof the behavior chart.  It is best to get input from your child as to what he or she will be motivated to work towards – or to avoid.

4.  Discuss the behavior chart with your child.  Use this time to explain the expectations of each behavior listed on the behavior chart.

5.  Put the behavior chart into effect.  Be firm, fair, and consistent while enforcing the behavior chart.

With an effective behavior chart in place, parents can set firm boundaries while establishing clear expectations for behavior.  It is a simple way to keep track of rules and expectations…as well as consequences and rewards.

If you are looking for a highly effective in-home behavior chart that improves child behavior – and takes things a step further than your typical behavior chart – then give The Parent Coach Plan a try!  It’s more than just a behavior chart – it’s a behavior program!

Q & A: Struggling with Our Grandson

Question:
URGENT! In 2004 I retired after 30+ years as accountant in the aerospace industry. About 15 months later, we inherited our teenage grandson to live with us because he got into very serious legal problems and placed on 3 yr probation, 2 years are remaining. His probation has a 7 pm curfew requiring that he be in our house every day by 7 pm. He could not continue living with his mother, our daughter, even though she lives close by and remains active in his life. I am his legal appointed guardian. He is now 16. He has made great improvements overall his life during the past year but struggles with keeping his probation curfew. We have just learned he is possibly using marijuana. He has great potential to be a good student, athlete, and a positive contribution to society. But if he continues to violate his probation, he will likely end up in a Texas Youth Commission facility for a long time. I need help establishing consequences, setting boundaries and whatever else you can offer. He functions very well in a structured environment with well-defined and enforced boundaries.


Answer:
My advice to you is to hold your grandson accountable for missed curfews and for any other activities that violate his probation. I would get to know his probation officer quite well (if you don’t already) then report each and every violation immediately to that officer. Be sure to let your grandson know that this will be your new “policy” for dealing with his non-compliance until he can demonstrate more responsible behavior.

You may also ask the probation department to begin administering random drug tests and or even try using an electronic home monitoring device. The “threat” of this may be all he needs to straighten up.

The products on our site (www.teenbehaviorcontracts.com) could be very helpful, especially if your grandson responds well to structure and consistency. You could use the behavior program and the contracts together to establish some clear behavioral expectations as well as the privileges and consequences that will result from his behavior.

I hope this helps.

Here is What I Really Mean When I Tell You to Be Careful…

To my children:

When you head out to do the things that you do, I often tell you to “be careful.”  Sometimes, however, this message gets blown over and the true message gets left behind.  When I tell you to be careful, I am actually reminding you to remember 3 important ways to keep yourself safe.  

Be Vigilant.

Being vigilant means that you are aware of your surroundings.  It means that you know what is going on around you…beyond your cell phone’s screen and beyond your “bubble.”  Being vigilant means that you are alert and observant – which is helpful when it comes to avoiding dangerous situations.  

Does someone look suspicious?  Is someone paying too much attention to you?  Are there signs in the area warning of danger?  These are all things that you should notice if you are being vigilant.

Be Cautious. 

Being cautious means that you are being careful to avoid potential problems or dangers.  A cautious person does not act impulsively or recklessly.  Being cautious means that you don’t take unnecessary risks or gamble with your safety. 

A cautious individual doesn’t approach animals in the wild or ignore posted safety warnings.  A cautious individual also wouldn’t run across a busy street without using a crosswalk – or play a rough sport without the proper safety equipment.  

Be Smart.

Being smart means staying focused and using your intelligence (and experiences) to avoid dangerous situations.  Being smart also means that you make good decisions when the situation dictates. 

A smart person wouldn’t do anything that would put their safety at risk – or the safety of others, for that matter. 

So, there you have it – the 3 expectations I have of you when I remind you each time to “be careful.”  Please remember them and put them to good use!

Being a Parent with an Alcohol Addiction: Why It’s Crucial to Seek Treatment

By Daniel Factor

Everyone in the household is negatively affected by a parent’s alcohol addiction. The kids no longer feel safe or loved because all the attention is given to patrons and staff members at bars and liquor stores. Sometimes the parent will stay at these venues all times of the night getting drunk with their buddies instead of caring for the responsibilities at home. Moreover, when the parent finally comes home in a drunken state, sometimes they become very belligerent after making crazy demands.

Neglect Can Create A Dangerous Situation For The Child 

Alcohol abuse becomes the main focus in the parent’s life. Children feel neglected, which prompts them to start seeking attention, affection, and positive motivations from outside sources. This type of attention seeking exposes the child to abuse because the parent is unavailable to protect them against predators.

Abuse Is A By-Product Of Alcoholism

One reason children seek security from other people is a result of the mental anguish and emotional torture that produces traumatic feelings and prolonged misery because of the parent’s alcohol-induced antics. Kids might not understand how to deal with a parent’s addicted state and will often devise plans to help them, which falls on deaf ears. When the plans do not work, the child might blame themselves. Their interest in school might start faltering. They might get into nefarious things to feel loved. The parent’s drunken stupor might lead to physical abuse which could bring CPS or DCFS in the picture.

Genetics Could Create Another Generation Of Alcohol Abusers 

It has been scientifically and medically proven that kids living in households with alcoholics have a higher chance of suffering emotional and behavioral problems. Moreover, if the parent builds up a high alcohol tolerance, there is a higher chance of passing that to the next generation. Additionally, if the mother drinks while pregnant, the baby might be born with mental disabilities. If a person is predisposed to alcoholism but chooses not drink, they might get into other pleasures to supplement those desires. This could include overeating, abusing illegal drugs, or becoming a sex addict.

Law Enforcement Will Likely Get Involved 

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), alcohol is responsible for 1 in 20 deaths worldwide. Up to 3 million people die annually at the hands of alcoholics. Liquor undoubtedly boosts the ego and makes people do things they would not normally do. For instance, many alcoholics will choose to drive under the influence after a night of partying. They feel sober enough to drive home. However, their impaired abilities will show otherwise. Let’s say they get lucky repeatedly and avoid getting caught. They figured they have never seen the police on their route home; therefore, it is safe to drive. However, that one single day when police cruisers are lurking in the shadows could change everything. After a failed sobriety test, their fate seals. Nothing is worse than getting locked down with a bunch of barbarians and aggressive guards who care minimal about safety. Moreover, the legal fight to get out of there could lasts for years. All of this could have been avoided with a simple choice.

Alcohol Abuse Can Lead To Death 

Here are some of the long-term effects of chronic drinking:

  • Liver disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Mental health problems
  • Leaning and memory problems

Why It Is Crucial To Seek Help?The help is out there. Just take the step. Some alcoholics can quit cold turkey, but others need a bit of motivation. Getting the proper help means seeking the advice from qualified professionals who have done this before. They have the expertise to make sure the alcoholic stays clean forever. Getting help save their life and their family’s life.

Addressing Cell Phone and Social Media Issues with Children and Teens

If you are the parent of a cell-phone-toting child or teen then you know first-hand how much of a challenge it can be to limit his or her activity on said phone.

Gone are the days of getting together in the neighborhood to play a game of street hockey or tackle football. No longer are kids interested in getting together for a walk to the park or for a bike ride around the neighborhood.  Kids these days would rather spend time sitting on their phones, either playing games, watching videos, or communicating with friends.

For some parents, allowing their children unlimited cell phone usage is perfectly fine…for the rest of us, however, too much phone time is concerning.

Below are three simple rules/strategies that parents can put in place to limits their child’s phone and/or social media time while at home (or even while away from home).

    1. A rule that I use at home with my own teen daughter is as follows: Phone time is allowed only during the first fifteen minutes of each hour. For instance, she can be on her phone from the top of the hour until a quarter after.  If she is caught using her phone outside of that time-frame then she forfeits her time for the next hour PLUS she owes 10 minutes of chore time (to be determined by me!).
    2. Another idea is to allow phone usage for an hour in the morning, and hour in the afternoon, and then another hour before bedtime. When the phone is not in use then it should be stored in a neutral location that prevents the child from constantly checking their phone. This arrangement works best during weekends and/or in the summer.
    3. And finally, parents can purchase an app that places limits on their child’s phone. There are apps that can restrict just about anything – times, contacts, which apps can be used, etc. A quick internet search will provide several options to choose from.

So, if you’re the parent of a child or teen that just can’t seem to limit his or her phone usage then perhaps one of the above tips/ideas will help.  If you think your child could benefit from a cell phone contract then consider looking at the teen contracts available here.

Q&A: Bickering Children

PROBLEM: Bickering Children!

Hi, I’m Heather.  I have 2 kids, ages 3 1/2 and 6.  My issues with discipline are self-induced. I don’t follow through, and I need some help staying the course.  I don’t want to feel helpless anymore!  My kids have reached a point where almost all they do is fight with each other. Adam is 6 and Katherine is 3 1/2. Katherine is really good at antagonizing her brother, and Adam has a really hard time ignoring her or letting things roll off his back.  I want to nurture their brother/sister bond, but am at a total loss as far as where to start.  Help?

ANSWER:

Hi Heather. Here are some tips for bickering children that you may or may not have already tried:

Find ways to put Adam into a role of “teacher” for Katherine.  Make it fun for him and praise him when he does a good job.  He could teach her age-appropriate topics such as letters, feelings, manners, etc. 

Purchase a toy or activity that they could do together and only allow them to use it when they are playing together nicely.  Supervise them as they play and intervene as necessary.  If problems persist, then take the toy/activity away and try again another day. 

Find ways to get them to work together to accomplish a task.  For instance, you could
have them work together to make cookies then let them each have one if they work well together well. 

Teach positive social skills. Many times, children don’t get along because they don’t know how to or they don’t have the necessary skills to do so.  Practice role-playing various situations and use that activity as a way to reinforce positive social skills. 

Make them feel good about their actions each time they do something nice for the other.  Point it out when possible then give praise.

When both of my daughters antagonize each other or end up bickeringbickering children, I send them both to their rooms and tell them that whoever goes to their room the quickest and the quietest will get out first.  I also tell them that if they both go straight to their rooms and both remain in there quietly, then they both get to come out sooner and at the same time.  This works almost every time.  By the time they get out they forget what they were arguing about in the first place!

I hope that you can use at least a couple of these tips to alleviate the bickering.  Good luck!

Ways to Avoid Drama in Your Life

dramatic peopleWe all have at least one person in our life that we would consider “high drama.” Regardless of the circumstances, there always seems to be a high degree of misfortune and/or tension that follows this person…like a dark shadow on a sunny day.

What causes all of the drama in this person’s life and how does one go about avoiding such drama?

The following list may not be a comprehensive one, but it lists several ways in which an individual can avoid (or at least minimize) drama in his or her life.

Stay away from toxic people.

Toxic individuals tend to display such behaviors as excessive jealousy or envy, cruelty towards others, general rudeness, inability to manage emotions, manipulating others, “playing the victim,” selfishness, constant blaming of others, and such. These people will suck the life right out of you and leave you drained!

Avoid living a high-risk life.

A high-risk life is full of dangerous and/or reckless behaviors such as using and/or abusing drugs or alcohol, hitchhiking, working a lot, being promiscuous, breaking the law, hanging with a “bad crowd,” driving recklessly, and such.

Live within your means.

Nothing adds more drama to life than constantly having no money or means to pay for life’s necessities.

Be prepared for emergencies.

Have a plan to deal with potential crises such as being on a date with someone that makes you uncomfortable, residential fire, car breaking down in the middle of nowhere, being followed, etc.

Remain calm when things get rough/Avoid over-reacting to minor incidents.

Over-reacting to a situation will rarely (if ever) help. Remain calm and deal with the situation in a calm and collected manner.

Pay attention to “red flags.”

If something or someone makes you uncomfortable then always err on the side of caution. Go with your gut!

Don’t “stir the pot.”

Someone that “stirs the pot” is someone that is essentially trying to cause drama. An individual that does this is simply trying to cause unrest, dissent, and…well, trouble!

So there you have it, a short list of ways to avoid drama in your life!

Q&A: Regarding “Entitled” Adult Son

The following is a question that was asked of Chris Theisen, creator of “The Parent Coach Plan” and co-owner of www.BoomerangKidsHelp.com.  This Q&A first appeared in a forum that appeared on the ParentCoachPlan.com website.

Question:  I saw your article and thought perhaps you might help We have a 30 year old son with crones disease. He works for us in a family business and earns 70K/year. He is always asking for money and I want it to stop. The problem is that his Dad and I have a lot of money. We are in our 60’s and are finally spending money we’ve been saving all our lives as we lived very carefully knowing retirement could be hard. The son has a house, three cars, 5 scooters and is getting married tomorrow. For his wedding he spent nothing, not even for the potographer. His girlfriends mother footed the whole bill, we kicked in for the caterer and are giving them 1000 for an airplane ticket for Hawaii. Earlier on we also paid off his second mortgage so he could afford to stay in his house. We also pay his medical bills as crones is expensive. I just don’t know where this ends. My husband says the next issue will be children. Even if his wife stays home to have kids, he makes 70K a year in a small town. He has expensive hobbies and I guess he doesn’t want to give them up. They also do not need 3 brand new cars. I have paid his property taxes twice in the last two years. I’m so tired of his sob stories that I do not want to see or speak to him. He only calls or comes to see us when he wants something. He is a totally selfish and needy to the max. I realize he has never Entitled Adult Child Living at Homelearned to budget. Giving the tax money was done so he wouldn’t lose his house. The medical money is out of guilt. Is 70K enough to live on? One of his last statement was “her parents are giving us a honeymoon and they aren’t as rich as you. You need to pay for some.” He feels we owe him money because we are wealthy and he is not. Where does it end? Because we have money will I always have to give it to my son. Oh, my oldest son has never asked for a penny. It’s really a strain on our family. Top this off with he works about 25 hours a week instead of 40 and he is paid anyway. (again, the crones and I don’t want him to lose his house) I need a shrink I’m sure, but they don’t have any advice on financial matters. I could sure use help…. I keep saying “not one more penny” then another issue arises and I feel guilty.

Answer: Let me first begin by answering your question…yes, 70K is enough to live on…unless, of course, you have a $100K lifestyle. I’m not sure which is worse…the fact that he is obviously taking advantage of you or the fact that you are allowing it to happen. Lessons are never learned when enablers are in charge. I, too, have parents that are wealthy and I feel guilty when they buy me dinner while I’m out visiting them. Your son should feel the same way. I would highly suggest turning your “hand-outs” into “loans.” Next time he asks for money, tell him that you will loan him a reasonable amount of money to help him through his “situation” but only if he signs a written agreement which states the terms of repayment. Do not loan him any more money until the previous loan is repaid. You could even have him do odd jobs to work off the loan (at a fair wage, of course). I’m sorry to say, but you should not be supporting expensive hobbies just because you feel guilty about his disease. Life will go on for him and he will cope. If you continue to give him hand-outs because you feel guilty then he will never learn to be responsible and he will always depend on you (or others). He certainly feels entitled to your money and that is not okay. Even if it means that he has to move into a smaller home (or condo) and sell one of his cars, then so be it. You are creating a monster by continuously giving him hand-outs. When the money stops, he will be forced to figure things out for himself…whether that means getting a second job, spending less money on hobbies, selling a car, or whatever. Good luck and keep me posted. I’d love to hear about what you choose to do and how it turns out.

When to Seek Professional Help for Your Child

professional help for childDeciding whether or not your child is in need of psychological, or even psychiatric help, is a decision that should not be taken lightly. Too often, parents refuse or reject the notion of seeking professional help for their behaviorally-challenged children. They instead attribute their child’s troubling behavior as “just a phase” or even deny that there is a problem in the first place, despite evidence to the contrary. Ignoring or denying serious behavior problems can be dangerous and could also be a detriment to a child’s well-being.

How to tell if your child needs help

that your child suffers from a psychological disorder that affects his or her ability to function normally (for instance, depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive tendencies, serious mood swings, or even psychosis). Also seek help if your child appears to have problems with anger. If he or she becomes aggressive, destructive, or reckless when angry, then seeking out a qualified child therapist is certainly recommended. Other reasons for seeking out therapy include: problems with the law, substance abuse problems, dangerous or out-of-control behavior, serious and persistent defiance, and/or any behavior that is a detriment to the family.  Suicidal ideation or attempts should be dealt with immediately and may require an emergency call and/or a trip to the hospital.

What to do if your child needs professional help

There are plenty of options when it comes to seeking professional help for your child. Search online for a therapist that specializes in childhood problems and that has experience dealing with the relevant issues. You can also look into some of the more intensive options such as residential treatment, boot camps, or even hospitalization (if the situation is serious enough). Most of these places can be found online or in the phone book. Other options include utilizing your child’s school counselor or psychologist, joining a support group, or even calling a hot line that deals with the issues confronting you (or your child). Contact your local mental health center and ask for advice if needed. Seeking professional help for your child is nothing to be ashamed of. You might find in your search that there are a lot of other parents out there facing the same problems or issues as you. Waiting for your child to “grow out of the stage” is bordering on neglect. Take action before it is too late.

10 “No-Travel” Things To Do With Your Kids During Spring Break

It’s that time of the year!Spring Break Ideas

Spring Break is undoubtedly a time to look forward to when you are a child or teen looking for a break from the monotony of school. Though as a parent, it might be a bit more distressing due to the planning and financial obligations that go along with arranging a fun-filled Spring Break vacation. Keep in mind that despite where you go you should always have car insurance, if you do not visit motor trade insurance online quote.

Well, if the finances aren’t there then there’s no need to fret…there are plenty of options to choose from that won’t break the bank.  You can do a little research and find pretty good options so that the whole family can have a fabulous spring break.

Below is a list of 10 things that parents can do with their child (or teen) during Spring Break without needing to travel or spend a lot of 1933 double eagle money:

    1. Schedule a “Day in the Park.”  Pack a picnic lunch and bring plenty of sports equipment, games, and other fun things to do.  Don’t forget sunscreen and plenty of water.
    2. Spend the day at a local rec center. Rec centers have all kinds of things to do…there’s usually swimming, an open gym, a playground, various “kid-friendly” classes (usually need to sign up in advance), and other activities.
    3. Go for a hike or a “nature walk.”
    4. Go fishing.
    5. Have a garage sale. It isn’t too early to do so!  Use the money you make to go shopping or to do an activity later that day.
    6. “Movie Marathon.” This is an especially good idea for when the weather is not cooperating.  Popcorn, candy, warm blankets, etc.
    7. Go on a Tour. Lots of local businesses offer tours of their facilities.  Check online for places in your area that offer such tours.
    8. Have a “Pamper Day” or “Spa Day.” Visit a local spa or simply purchase a few supplies and do your own day of pampering.
    9. Play an organized game or sport. Gather the neighborhood kids (who are also off for Spring Break) and get a game of kickball, soccer, street hockey (or whatever else) going.
    10. Go do a paid activity. It could be mini-golf, laser tag, bowling, a movie, an arcade, or whatever else sounds fun!

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Qualities of a Well-Rounded Child

pride in appearanceHere’s a list of qualities that I feel describes a well-rounded child:

He is able to embrace and appreciate “alone time.”

This is a valuable skill that is possessed by less and less children these days.

He is able to delay gratification.

In other words: He is patient!

He is able to see both sides of an issue.

This is a special “skill” that many adults lack!

He appreciates and has a respect for diversity.

He is not bothered in the least bit by people that are “different” than him.

He is vigilant.

He is aware of his surroundings and is alert to potential safety issues and/or concerns. He is observant.

He knows when to “drop it.”

Sometimes arguments just aren’t worth the time and effort that goes into having them. A well-rounded child knows when to drop the issue and how to bow out gracefully.

He is appreciative.

“Thank you” is not something that goes unsaid. He shows his appreciation when appropriate…and that appreciation appears to be genuine.

He is able and willing to put others first.

This one is self-explanatory…and well-rounded children do this without being asked.

He is optimistic.

Instead of dwelling on the negatives, this child looks “at the bright side” of any given situation. He keeps things positive and refrains from negativity.

He learns from his mistakes.

Enough said.

He takes responsibility for his actions.

Rather than making up silly excuses and/or blaming others, this child takes full responsibility for his actions and accepts any repercussions that might result.

He takes good care of his mind and his body.

He eats healthy while keeping junk food to a minimum. He reads and seems to enjoy learning.  He avoids harmful substances such as tobacco, alcohol, and drugs.  He gets regular exercise and possibly even plays a sport.  He might even play an instrument or participate in a school club.

He does things in moderation.

Video games don’t rule his day. An endless barrage of sweets isn’t necessary in order for him to make it through the day.  He spends time doing a variety of activities…with a variety of friends. He is able to put his mobile device away for an hour or two at a time without going spastic!  You get the idea!

Can you think of any other qualities that well-rounded children possess?